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Michigan Poverty Exemption

Taxpayers must apply for a poverty exemption from the property taxes on their home every year.  Every municipality is required to have an income test and an asset test. 

The exemption is not always a full exemption (meaning all taxes are exempted).  Usually it is only a partial exemption. There are several things you must do to get the exemption:

  1. Exemption is only on your principle residence;
  2. You must apply for the exemption each year; 
  3. Your household income must be lower than what your township requires (income test); and
  4. The value of your assets must be lower than what your township requires (asset test).

If you are struggling to pay your property taxes, you should also consider appealing the value that the assessor has placed on your property. 

Requesting a poverty exemption only requires three steps, which we provide in detail in our article: Three Steps to a Poverty Exemption.

If the assessor rejects your poverty exemption application (because it is somehow incomplete), you must make sure it is corrected so that it will be reviewed by the Board of Review.  If your application is denied, there are three additional steps to appealing the denial, which we provide in detail in our article: Three Steps to Appealing Your Poverty Exemption Denial to the Michigan Tax Tribunal.

Specific Rules and Forms

The State Tax Commission has published rules that local assessors must obey.  You can read these rules, which are set out in STC Bulletin 6 of 2017 (Exemption of Principle Residence by Reason of Poverty).


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